OF-07-03 Geologic Map of the Signal Peak Quadrangle, Gunnison County, Colorado

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SKU: OF-07-03D Categories: , , , Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Citation: Stork, Allen, James C. Coogan, Robert Fillmore, Holly Brunkal, Joe Nicolette, and Andrew Payton. “OF-07-03 Geologic Map of the Signal Peak Quadrangle, Gunnison County, Colorado.” Geologic. Open File Reports. Denver, CO: Colorado Geological Survey, 2007.

Description

The purpose of Colorado Geological Survey Open File Report 07-3, Geologic Map of the Signal Peak Quadrangle, Gunnison County, Colorado is to describe the geologic setting, mineral and ground-water resources, and geologic hazards of this 7.5-minute quadrangle located in western Colorado. Field work for this project was conducted during the summer of 2006 by consulting geologists Allen Stork, James C. Coogan, Robert Fillmore and Holly Brunkal, and field assistants Joe Nicolette and Andrew Payton. Digital ZIP/PDF download. OF-07-03D

From the authors notes:
The Signal Peak 7.5’ quadrangle is located east of the town of Gunnison in central Gunnison County, Colorado. The quadrangle contains portions of both the US Highway 50 and Colorado Highway 114. The main drainages include Tomichi, Cochetopa and Cabin Creeks. The quadrangle lies on the southeastern margin of the Piceance Basin between the Sawatch and Gunnison uplifts and also lies north and east of the volcanic centers in the West Elk and San Juan Mountains.

Previous geologic work in the Signal Peak 7.5’ quadrangle includes unpublished field studies by the Western State College Geology Department and regional-scale mapping by Tweto and others (1976) and Ellis and others (1987). The adjacent Houston Gulch (Olson 1976a), Iris NW (Hedlund and Olson, 1974), Iris (Olson, 1976b), Almont (Coogan and others, 2005) and Gunnison (Stork and others, 2006) quadrangles have been mapped at a scale of 1:24,000. The adjacent Crystal Creek and portions of adjacent Parlin quadrangles (Dewitt and others, 2002) have been mapped at a scale of 1:30,000.